Biography

After retiring in 2001 from his position as Professor of English/Director of Creative Writing at the State University of New York at Fredonia, where he had taught for 34 years, David Lunde and his wife, fantasy writer Patricia A. McKillip, moved to North Bend, Oregon where they now reside.

Lunde was born in Berkeley, California in 1941, but moved to Saudi Arabia in 1946, where his father was an engineer with the Arabian American Oil Company. The Aramco communities of Dhahran and Abqaiq were his home for the next sixteen years, until his graduation from college. This experience has been the source of many poems.

After earning his B.A. in English Literature and Composition at Knox College, he applied to the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop on the recommendation of Archibald MacLeish. He was accepted and worked his way through graduate school by inking graphs of satellite data for Dr. James Van Allen and the other faculty and graduate students of the Physics and Astronomy Department. David had been a long time reader of science fiction, and under this new stimulus he began writing SF stories and science related poetry.

It was at Iowa also, that he began translating poetry from other languages. His advisor, Donald Justice, knowing that David had studied French, asked him to make translations of two poems by RenÚ Char for an anthology he was editing. This experience began a lifelong fascination with the challenge of translation, and David went on to translate poems from Provenšal, Italian, Spanish and Chinese, as well as French.

He has been Co-editor and publisher of The Basilisk Press, Contributing Editor of Escarpments, Managing Editor of Drama & Theater, and Poetry Editor of The Riverside Quarterly. He has received the Old Gold Fellowship in Writing (U. of Iowa Writer's Workshop), the Academy of American Poets Prize, a Yaddo residency, and two Rhysling Awards for "Best Science Fiction Poem of the Year." His poems, stories and translations have appeared internationally in more than 230 periodicals and 40-odd anthologies.

Bibliography